Biography

Welcome to the wonderful world of parody, AND have a blest parodic day!!

Robert Chambers


Rob Chambers is one of 35 remaining natives of Atlanta GA. The millions of other residents are from Cincinnati OH. Chambers has been a reporter and columnist for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and he has covered his locale for The Economist. Beginning his career as a college English teacher, Chambers quickly “sold out” for the thrill of manufacturing paper pads that soak up blood in supermarket meat trays. From there, he went on to the manufacture of plastic garbage bags and in a logical progression became a stockbroker. He bounced around the financial services industry in various incapacities for nearly two decades, mostly by way of ill-timed public presentations for the mutual fund industry. As a spokesman, he preached physical abstinence in the 1970s, material abstinence in the 1980s, and emotional absinthe in the 1990s. Somewhere along the way Chambers also spent a couple of years in the public relations “game,” capping his career at Hill and Knowlton by standing agape as his major client was hauled off to the Federal pen. At present, Chambers has returned to college teaching near Atlanta (at Kennesaw State University) where he hopes to induce the English Department to inflate its trendiness by adding Animal Rights and Animal Rhetoric as a new sub-discipline. Chambers has been writing parodies since spending time as a lad in a barnyard and being inspired by the smell of chickens. Indeed, Chambers has written Parody: The Art That Plays With Art and its less serious companion volume, How To Write Parodies and Become Immortal, in preparation for his goal of swimming the English Channel costumed as a giant Blue Hen of Delaware. His other goal for the 21st Century is to locate and to mutilate his inner child.

Works

(1) Parody: The Art That Plays With Art;
(2) How to Write Parodies and Become Immortal
Rob Chambers has written two books about parody. The first is a radically new theoretical approach to the subject, and the second is a very light-hearted companion volume that demonstrates how to put that new theory to work.

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